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Author

Tom Hocking

Publication Date

1-1-2013

Abstract

This project demonstrates the redemptive potential of a unified Church by connecting Bellflower Brethren with three other Bellflower congregations in a coordinated effort to upgrade the earthquake preparedness of their shared neighborhoods. It reveals that churches of differing theological traditions can work together for the greater good of their shared context. The project will deepen the spiritual vitality of participating church members as they serve together, helping them appreciate and maximize their shared unity in Christ. The participating members also will receive training in how to engage in a redemptive way the unsaved neighbors who live near their church’s campus. Additionally, this project will provide opportunities for the members of these churches to reflect on what the Bible has to say about the importance of partnering with other Christians in the shared spaces of life.

This discussion is presented in three major sections. Part One examines the demographics and unique features of the City of Bellflower and Bellflower Brethren to demonstrate how both are uniquely positioned for this earthquake-preparedness initiative. Part Two develops the biblical theologies of “place” and “partnership,” which are foundational for this contextualized ecumenical project. Part Three offers a blueprint for the earthquake-preparedness missional initiative. That blueprint includes specific cognitive, affective, and behavioral goals and identifies the qualifications and responsibilities of the required facilitators. Finally, Part Three presents a timeline for the implementation of the initiative and describes the resources needed both to train volunteers and assess the effectiveness of the initiative.

Content Reader: Joe Colletti, PhD

Date Created

April 2018

Collection Number

DMin125

Document Type

Dissertation

Source

DMin125-0104

Language

English

Rights

Material is subject to copyright.

Comments

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