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Publication Date

6-1-2013

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to produce transformation and renewal within the Progressive National Baptist Convention, Inc. (hereafter, PNBC) through a change process called the D.A.N.C.E (Discovery, Analysis, Navigation, Choreography, and Execution). This process will enable leaders and members of the PNBC to examine and address critical questions related to their identity, purpose, and agenda in light of post-Civil Rights realities.

The PNBC, like many Black social and religious organizations, emerged as a result of its time, a time characterized by segregation and discrimination legislated by the United States government. Yet with the success of socio-political movements like the Civil Rights Movement, resulting in the passing of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1968, times have changed. These changes have impacted every aspect of the Black community, including the Black Church and parachurch organizations.

Because the PNBC derived its identity, purpose, and agenda from the sociological, political, and religious climate of the past, several critical questions must be asked at this point. These include: Who is the PNBC now? What is its purpose and agenda today? Most importantly, who does the PNBC need to be in order to remain relevant and progressive in the eyes of a post-modern, post-Civil Rights, “post-Joshua” generation?

The purpose of this paper is to set forth a change process that will produce transformation and renewal within the PNBC. This process will allow this organization to examine and address critical questions related to its identity, purpose, and agenda in light of post-Civil Rights realities. By engaging this process, the organization will be able to re-imagine and revamp its mission with the goal of re-establishing its relevance.

Theological Mentor: Kurt Fredrickson, PhD

Date Created

April 2018

Collection Number

DMin125

Document Type

Dissertation

Source

DMin125-0115

Language

English

Rights

Material is subject to copyright.

Comments

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