Publication Date

8-1-2013

Abstract

The focus of this study is to develop an unconventional strategic ministerial approach to effectively minister to Navy SEALs by being filled, led, and empowered by the Holy Spirit. The SEAL community is a closed community of elite warriors. It is one of the most difficult military training places in the world. A chaplain in this setting must be capable of holding his own, by being physically, spiritually, and intellectually proficient to effectively minister to God’s people.

The chaplain for the Navy SEALs must first be a man of God—a man of character and integrity who is able to confront hard and difficult men with the only hope of the world, Jesus Christ. He must be physically and morally fit and demonstrate that Christian workers can use biblical themes and examples to be effectual witnesses and ministers of Christ.

This project will examine the unique setting of military ministry with the U.S. Navy SEAL community and the “mission” as in Acts 1:8: “But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be My witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and the ends of the earth.” This project will also examine the relevant theological data with the “beyond” portion of the Mission beyond Commission. The role of the of the Holy Spirit is critical for effective ministry in any setting and especially needed to fulfill the Great Commission in ministry with the U.S. Navy SEALs. The focus and content of this unique setting in ministry will require a power beyond formal education and a chaplain’s own abilities. God brought reconciliation to his people in the Old Testament through Moses. God reflects his desire to be in relationship in the New Testament through Jesus and the person of the Holy Spirit.

Theological Mentor: Kurt Fredrickson, PhD

Date Created

April 2018

Collection Number

DMin125

Document Type

Dissertation

Source

DMin125-0129

Language

English

Rights

Material is subject to copyright.

Comments

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