Publication Date

3-2009

Abstract

This project’s goal is to create a training tool for Generation X church leaders suited for a postmodern environment in which the concepts of missional ecclesiology are necessary for the growth of the church. The concepts of missional ecclesiology including the rise and fall of Christendom, nature of institutionalization, and leadership and spiritual formation are confined to modern media formats. Meanwhile Generation X individuals learn about new perspectives and ideas better through interactive, postmodern formats. This paper’s thesis is that postmodern mediums, namely theatre, can best train Generation X leaders in missional ecclesiology. A drama intended for the theatre accompanies a small group reflection exercise for use as a Central Florida Presbytery’s (CFP) leadership development event.

After a brief analysis of the CFP’s historical situation, this study describes the epistemological shift between modernity and postmodernity. Generation Xers are shown to share a unique, postmodern learning style. The missional solutions provided by scholars within the field of missional ecclesiology are presented, and yet shown to be confined in modern formats, thus inaccessible to most Generation X leaders in the CFP.

Narrative theology is the preferred method to present missiological concepts using story-based narrative and visual images. Goals are established for the project and are achieved through a written drama and post-production small group reflection exercise. Small group theory is examined showing small groups to be an excellent environment for Generation X learners to process the concepts of the theatrical production and apply them to their ministry context. This study concludes with a strategy for producing the drama, creating effective facilitators, and guiding the small groups.

Content Reader: Dr. Todd Johnson

Date Created

3-19-2018

Collection Number

DMin125

Document Type

Dissertation

Source

DMin125-0018

Language

English

Rights

Material is subject to copyright.

Comments

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