Publication Date

12-1-2015

Abstract

The goal of this project was two-fold, to engineer culture change within an established, existing congregation seeking to move a programmatic and institutional church away from an attractional ministry paradigm and towards a more missional paradigm and, secondly, to embed a new commitment within a local congregation to plant churches. A core conviction of this project is that planting churches is the most effective way to grow the Kingdom of God. The Kingdom grows when new church plants minister on the front lines of culture more effectively than an established congregation can, but also as the established congregation is refreshed and renewed in its own commitment to the Missio Dei and thus experiences its own awakening. Thus, the Kingdom of God grows as both the new church plant and the established church grow in their own unique ministries to their own unique contexts and the tribes to whom they minister.

There is a great need to re-imagine ecclesiology and re-narrate a concept of “church.” Church is not simply a place where people go, but the way the people of God in Christ live as a community. A fresher and flatter concept of church as a missional community must begin to anchor in people’s imaginations.

Similarly, just as the concept of church must broaden so too must the practice of planting churches. Planting models can no longer rely on a core to crowd model that focuses on beautiful buildings in fast growing suburbs with large ministry budgets that emphasized worship and programmatic attendance. Instead, planting must look to the Book of Acts for a new paradigm of church that highlights a network of communities gathered in smaller groups across a city in the homes, coffee shops, bars, parks, or other gathering places of a given city.

Content Read: Kurt Fredrickson, PhD

Date Created

April 2018

Collection Number

DMin125

Document Type

Dissertation

Source

DMin125-0208

Language

English

Rights

Material is subject to copyright.

Comments

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