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Author

Philip J. Der

Publication Date

3-1-2016

Abstract

St. Christopher’s Anglican Church is a Cantonese-speaking, Anglican congregation. It moved to Richmond Hill seven years ago with the intent of reaching local Chinese residents. However, this has not yet been accomplished. The purpose of this project is to awaken St. Christopher’s theologically, and to know and love the community, our mission field. The first part of the project addresses the ministry context of St. Christopher’s and the local community. It examines the history, changing culture, and organizational system of the parish.

The second part of the project engages the theological and biblical aspects pertinent to the missional purpose of the project. It begins with literature reviews of the theology of the missional church, the missional methodology in Chinese Christian churches in North America, and the art of building relationships. In the latter half of this part, the theological development of Anglican Evangelicals is presented. This is followed by the dialogue of missio Dei in the Evangelical community as well as theological perspectives on rooting. The findings of the above shape the content of the ministry initiative.

The final part includes the implementation of action plans in building relationships within the congregation and with the neighbors. The “Love Your Neighbors” small group campaign mobilizes the whole church to be aware theologically of faithful presence, to get to know our neighbors, and to invite them to church events. The campaign demonstrates very positive signs of the beginning of missional transformation. This will prepare the congregation for further change in enriching our souls and caring for our neighbors in the following year.

Content Reader: Jonathan Wu, DMin

Date Created

April 2018

Collection Number

DMin125

Document Type

Dissertation

Source

DMin125-0233

Language

English

Rights

Material is subject to copyright.

Comments

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