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Publication Date

7-1-2016

Abstract

The purpose of this project is to cultivate and equip members of the Apostolic Faith Church in Seattle, Washington through a theologically formed strategy, sensitive to Jesus' missional charge and a Pentecostal Holiness identity, to engage and embrace their surrounding communities. The project examines Scripture for examples and instruction, arguing the Church is sent as Jesus was sent into the world. The Church is charged with being a distinctive community, reflecting the mission of God to the community and all of creation. The project further argues that engaging and embracing “the other” was indicative of Jesus’ ministry and a biblical charge for disciples.

A twofold approach is enjoined to facilitate the project. The first part involved a series of sermons and Bible studies establishing the foundational necessity of engaging and embracing, and a dialogue with a small group of church leaders concerning possibilities for engagement with the community. The second part of the project was the establishment of an experimental event with the congregation, attempting to engage and embrace the local community. This event was followed by a celebration and a time of reflection regarding the results of the event.

Evaluation of the project concludes that the congregation’s understanding of the mission of God through engaging and embracing the community was expanded and challenged by both teaching and experience. Further evaluation and analysis shows that a congregationally driven approach to engaging and embracing proved to be more effective and organic than a one-time prescribed event with many smaller opportunities offering a greater range of involvement. The project has provided an impetus and catalyst for further engagement by the congregation.

Content Reader: Randy Rowland, DMin

Date Created

April 2018

Collection Number

DMin125

Document Type

Dissertation

Source

DMin125-0249

Language

English

Rights

Material is subject to copyright.

Comments

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