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Publication Date

7-2008

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to develop a reproducible church planting process for the Adventist church within Australia. It will be shown that the Adventist church started as a church planting movement. Today, however, while churches are being planted rapidly in non-first world countries, there is little in the way of church planting in secular, first would countries. It is felt that, if a reproducible process for church planting could be developed in Australia, a secular society, it might help restore church planting to the foreground of evangelism and disciple making for the church. The Adventist church could once again become a church planting movement.

Part One examines the ministry context of the paper. The Adventist’s beginnings as a church planting movement will be examined, along with how it lost its church planting emphasis. The current status of church planting in Australia, along with its current challenges will be canvassed.

Part Two of the paper examines the theology that motivated the early Adventist church to mission. The church’s theology, particularly regarding the Sabbath, the Holistic nature of man, and eschatological beliefs, was the fuel for the church planting method.

Part Three describes the healthy characteristics of church planting movements and the essential structural elements of the proposed church planting process. Part Four outlines the suggested reproducible process for church planting. It also describes how this process can be implemented.

This paper concludes that it is possible to develop a church planting process that is reproducible for the Adventist context worldwide. It takes into account the message the Adventist church wants to share with the world and a method of sharing that message.

Content Reader: Dr. Robert E. Logan

Date Created

3-15-2018

Collection Number

DMin125

Document Type

Dissertation

Source

DMin125-0005

Language

English

Rights

Material is subject to copyright.

Comments

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