Title

Childhood Abuse, Dissociation, and Coping Self-Efficacy As Predictors of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

Publication Date

6-2016

Abstract

Previous research demonstrates a relationship between childhood abuse and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), between NSSI and dissociation, and between maladaptive coping and both NSSI and dissociation. The present study was designed to explore the role of coping self-efficacy in the relationships between various forms of childhood abuse and neglect, dissociation, and NSSI, among an ethnically diverse sample of 916 undergraduate students. All correlations between total scores were significant in the hypothesized direction: Child abuse variables were both positively correlated with NSSI and dissociation and negatively correlated with coping self-efficacy. Dissociation was negatively correlated with self-efficacy, dissociation was positively correlated with NSSI, and self-efficacy was negatively correlated with NSSI. Regression analyses demonstrated that childhood physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, gender, dissociation, and coping self-efficacy were all modest but significant predictors of NSSI. These relationships bear relevance to further research on and treatment of both dissociation and NSSI.

First Advisor

Clements, Mari L.

Date Uploaded

10-10-2018

Collection Number

Psych0371E

Document Type

Dissertation

File Name

Bennett_fuller.psych_0371E_10161

Language

English

Keywords

Self-mutilation, Self-destructive behavior, Adjustment, Abused children

Disciplines

Psychology

Rights

Material hosted by ProQuest subject to copyright

Comments

This was uploaded by the David Allan Hubbard Library from the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (ProQuest). If there are any mistakes in this record, please contact archives@fuller.edu.

ProQuest URL

https://search.proquest.com/docview/1846944375/fulltextPDF/C718F48D58874F71PQ/1?accountid=11008

Upload File

wf_no

Embargo Period

10-10-2018

Share

COinS