Title

Embodied Psychotherapy: A Critique of the Mind-Body Problem

Publication Date

7-2014

Abstract

This dissertation explores the enduring confusion in the field of psychology concerning the material body. After delineating the problems with how the body is currently appropriated within the field of psychotherapy, three current conceptualizations of the body in psychology were reviewed and critiqued, namely body image theory, cognitive science, and body psychotherapy; these critiques of conceptualizations of the body illustrated significant limitations in the understanding of and value given to the body. Continuing on, Perrin Elisha’s The Conscious Body and her articulation of the various solutions to the mind–body problem were utilized, pointing to the need for a cohesive metatheoretical framework for appropriating the body in psychotherapy. Finally, a working metatheory based on the theory of embodied cognition was detailed, with the goal of providing a scaffold for clinicians to understand, conceptualize, and approach the body in a way that offers space for the body to possess value, validity, and a language.

First Advisor

Clements, Mari L.

Date Uploaded

10-10-2018

Collection Number

Psych0371E

Document Type

Dissertation

File Name

Abney_fuller.psych_0371E_10080

Language

English

Keywords

Mind and body, Mind and body therapies

Disciplines

Psychology

Rights

Material hosted by ProQuest subject to copyright

Comments

This was uploaded by the David Allan Hubbard Library from the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (ProQuest). If there are any mistakes in this record, please contact archives@fuller.edu.

ProQuest URL

https://search.proquest.com/docview/1625429947/fulltextPDF/DC4B2EC6749B46DDPQ/1?accountid=11008

Upload File

wf_no

Embargo Period

10-10-2018

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