Title

Chinese American Parents of Typically Developing Children and Children With Autism: A Study on Parenting Stress, Parenting Satisfaction, Parenting Style, and Acculturation

Publication Date

9-2012

Abstract

Parenting in any culture is multi-faceted and influenced by family history, societal norms, and the cultural milieu. Traditionally, Chinese parents value interdependence, respect, and obedience; meanwhile, Western societies place more value upon independence, autonomy, and democratic participation (Wang & Chang, 2010). Chinese American parenting has been examined under Baumrind's (1971) parenting styles, but parenting satisfaction and stress remain relatively unexplored. In addition, with the continued rise of autism diagnoses, many researchers have focused on studying family functioning, but the Chinese American parent's experience of autism remains unexamined. The current study compared parenting stress and parenting satisfaction between parents of typically developing children and parents of children with autism. Stress of parenting tasks and challenging behaviors did not differ between parents of children with autism and parents of typically developing children. There was no difference between groups on parenting satisfaction, but both groups reported greatest satisfaction with their parent-child relationship, followed by satisfaction with their spouses' parenting, and least satisfaction with their own parenting. Participants who reported greater identification with their country of origin also reported greater authoritarian parenting. Chinese American parenting is nuanced and warrants more investigation. Implications, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed.

First Advisor

Clements, Mari L.

Date Uploaded

10-24-2018

Collection Number

Psych0371E

Document Type

Dissertation

File Name

Wang_fuller.psych_0371E_10029

Language

English

Keywords

Chinese Americans, Cultural assimilation, Parents of autistic children, Parenting, United States

Disciplines

Psychology

Rights

Material hosted by ProQuest subject to copyright

Comments

This was uploaded by the David Allan Hubbard Library from the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (ProQuest). If there are any mistakes in this record, please contact archives@fuller.edu.

ProQuest URL

https://search.proquest.com/docview/1476212383/7D80AF60B0AA495DPQ/1?accountid=11008

Upload File

wf_no

Embargo Period

10-24-2018

Share

COinS