Title

Self-Efficacy and Aid Workers

Publication Date

10-2016

Abstract

As a result of frequent exposure to trauma, aid workers are at high risk for experiencing negative psychological symptoms. This study highlighted ways to support humanitarian aid workers by examining training specifically geared at fostering critical incident self-efficacy in aid workers, and the constructs of critical incident self-efficacy and general self-efficacy as they relate to experiences of traumatic symptomatology and resilience. Sixty-three aid workers completed questionnaires regarding efficacy, resilience, coping, and posttraumatic stress symptomatology at baseline, and 46 aid workers completed the same measures after the training workshop. Multiple regression analysis indicated that higher levels of self-efficacy relate to higher resilience levels. General self-efficacy and critical incident coping self-efficacy (CICSE) were stronger after the training, even when controlling for histories of trauma. Histories of trauma contributed significant variance to CICSE before the training but were insignificant after the training. These findings suggest that aid organizations can support their workers by providing trainings that enhance efficacies in order to promote resilience.

First Advisor

Nolty, Anne

Date Uploaded

10-24-2018

Collection Number

Psych0371E

Document Type

Dissertation

File Name

Turner_fuller.psych_0371E_10170

Language

English

Keywords

Self-efficacy, Stress management, Resilience, Psychological tests, Mental Health

Disciplines

Psychology

Rights

Material hosted by ProQuest subject to copyright

Comments

This was uploaded by the David Allan Hubbard Library from the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (ProQuest). If there are any mistakes in this record, please contact archives@fuller.edu.

ProQuest URL

https://search.proquest.com/docview/1901451573/ACAE91032F644937PQ/1?accountid=11008

Upload File

wf_no

Embargo Period

10-24-2018

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