Title

Gender Role Conflict as an Indicator of Low Fitness

Publication Date

4-2015

Abstract

Spearheaded by O’Neil (2008), research into gender role conflict (GRC) has been conducted for 30 years. O’Neil has discussed the origins of GRC as being products of sexist and patriarchal culture. An alternative view was presented which argued that GRC is a product of evolutionary forces and functions as an indicator of low fitness. A critique of the social constructionist view of gender roles is provided. The development of gender roles as a product of evolutionary and selection pressures is described, with an understanding of how evolution shapes behaviors and tendencies within the individuals over generations. A reevaluation of the negative consequences of GRC is provided through this new understanding in order to describe the effect on the individual and those around them on biological and genetic levels through their descendants. Suggestions for implementing programs to help individuals learn to resolve GRC are provided.

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology (PhD)

First Advisor

Dueck, Alvin

Document Type

Dissertation

Language

English

Keywords

Sex role, Gender expression, Sex differences, Evolutionary psychology, Physical fitness

Disciplines

Psychology

Comments

Public Access: If you attend a college or university, you may be granted access for free through your school library subscription to ProQuest Theses & Dissertations. Copies may be available for purchase via ProQuest Dissertations Publishing https://dissexpress.proquest.com/search.html

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Embargo Period

10-22-2018

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