Title

Scapegoat Pathology

Author

Istvan Kacso

Publication Date

2-2015

Abstract

Is it possible to live without conflicts? Individuals and groups of individuals are often scapegoated to resolve conflicts and crisis. Based on previous research, it is argued that when a person or group is scapegoated (bullied) for a significant period of time, the individual or group is in danger of developing a certain pathology, named scapegoat pathology in this dissertation. A Global Assessment of Scapegoat Health (GASH) is proposed. It is also argued that there is a high risk that scapegoat pathology permeates the culture of the scapegoated group, and if the individuals of the group do not develop and maintain a healthy (collective) identity and (master) narrative(s), then they will develop a maladaptive and pathological culture. Scapegoated cultures were contrasted and used as examples to illustrate the arguments of the dissertation. Special attention was paid to Hungarians and Hungarian culture. Finally, an argument is made for specific interventions to address scapegoat pathology and maladaptive (pathological) cultures resulting from scapegoating, bullying, and mobbing.

First Advisor

Dueck, Alvin C.

Date Uploaded

10-17-2018

Collection Number

Psych0371E

Document Type

Dissertation

File Name

Kacso_fuller.psych_0371E_10113

Language

English

Keywords

Blame, Blaming the victim, Bullying

Disciplines

Psychology

Rights

Material hosted by ProQuest subject to copyright

Comments

This was uploaded by the David Allan Hubbard Library from the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (ProQuest). If there are any mistakes in this record, please contact archives@fuller.edu.

ProQuest URL

https://search.proquest.com/docview/1710076994/CE2844C084A14212PQ/1?accountid=11008

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wf_no

Embargo Period

10-17-2018

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