Title

White Matter Integrity in Pediatric Closed Head Injury: The Relationship Between Callosal Area and Interhemispheric Transfer Time

Publication Date

5-2014

Abstract

Almost one million children suffer head injuries in the United States every year. These injuries often result in emotional, social, and cognitive deficits and delays. However, very few studies have investigated brain morphology and function in pediatric TBI. Although the corpus callosum is commonly damaged in traumatic brain injury, very few studies have examined this brain structure in pediatric TBI despite its prominent role in hemispheric communication and integration. The current study addresses this gap in the literature by investigating the relationship between white matter integrity (callosal area) and interhemispheric transfer time (IHTT) in pediatric closed head injury. Participants included 21 children and adolescents with TBI and 22 age-matched healthy controls. Results indicated that IHTT was significantly slower in the TBI group compared to controls. However, almost half of the TBI participants demonstrated normal IHTT based upon the control group mean IHTT. Four of five TBI participants with visible callosal lesions belonged to the group with normal IHTT. Although a significant relationship between IHTT and TBI was found, this study indicates that children and adolescents with TBI can demonstrate normal IHTT, even with callosal lesions macroscopically detectable on midsagittal magnetic resonance imaging. IHTT was also found to become significantly faster with age, but no significant relationship was found between IHTT and total or regional callosal area.

First Advisor

Marion, Sarah DeBoard

Date Uploaded

10-16-2018

Collection Number

Psych0371E

Document Type

Dissertation

File Name

Guthrie_fuller.psych_0371E_10067

Language

English

Keywords

Brain-damaged children, Psychological testing, Pediatric neurology, Corpus callosum, Pediatric neurology

Disciplines

Psychology

Rights

Material hosted by ProQuest subject to copyright

Comments

This was uploaded by the David Allan Hubbard Library from the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (ProQuest). If there are any mistakes in this record, please contact archives@fuller.edu.

ProQuest URL

https://search.proquest.com/docview/1620845653/CF5E01E837C04C64PQ/1?accountid=11008

Upload File

wf_no

Embargo Period

10-16-2018

Share

COinS