Title

Secondary Traumatic Stress Among Ugandan Aid Workers

Publication Date

9-2013

Abstract

This study examines secondary traumatic stress (STS) among national humanitarian aid workers in the post-conflict context of northern Uganda. A cross-sectional survey measuring STS, primary and secondary trauma exposure, organizational and social support factors, as well as demographic and work-related factors, was completed by 376 national staff from 21 humanitarian organizations in northern Uganda. Results indicated that personal exposure to war-trauma, hearing about war-trauma from personal acquaintances, and hearing trauma stories from beneficiaries each accounted for unique variance in STS. Results support a dose-response relationship between listening to trauma stories and STS symptoms in national aid workers. Additionally, results indicated inverse relationships between STS and supervision, and STS and co-worker team cohesion. Organizational implications are discussed.

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology (PhD)

First Advisor

Eriksson, Cynthia

Document Type

Dissertation

Language

English

Keywords

Secondary traumatic stress, Humanitarian assistance, Uganda

Disciplines

Psychology

Comments

Public Access: If you attend a college or university, you may be granted access for free through your school library subscription to ProQuest Theses & Dissertations. Copies may be available for purchase via ProQuest Dissertations Publishing https://dissexpress.proquest.com/search.html

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Embargo Period

10-12-2018

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