Title

Paul’s Language of ZHΛOΣ: A Study in Monosemy

Publication Date

2-2014

Abstract

This dissertation is a linguistic and rhetorical-theological examination of Paul’s language of zēlos. In recognition of the narrow scope of previous studies on “Jewish zeal,” the focus of the present work is on reading together all occurrences of the zēlos word group within a text. The study examines comparative literary and epigraphical evidence concerning imitation and jealousy/zeal in antiquity (primarily Greek, but also Hebrew and Latin sources). The author considers the usefulness of corpus analysis and Systemic Functional Linguistics, but argues that for this project linguistic data are better managed within a robust pragmatic account of language, and that close readings of relevant texts are most beneficial for this task. After building the case for a monosemic bias within the framework of Relevance Theory, the case is argued that Paul capitalizes upon the semantic flexibility of the zēlos word group to advance a series of rhetorical purposes in Galatians, 1-2 Corinthians, and Romans; specifically, the reversal of cultural expectations about the people and qualities that are worthy of emulation.

Degree Name

PHD in Theology

First Advisor

Downs, David

Date Uploaded

12-12-2018

Collection Number

ATS1643E

Document Type

Dissertation

File Name

Lappenga_fuller.ats_1643E_10033

Language

English

Keywords

Jealousy, Rhetoric in the Bible, Rhetorical criticism, Paul, Linguistic analysis, Linguistics

Disciplines

Missions and World Christianity

Rights

Material hosted by ProQuest subject to copyright

Comments

This was uploaded by the David Allan Hubbard Library from the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (ProQuest). If there are any mistakes in this record, please contact archives@fuller.edu.

ProQuest URL

https://search.proquest.com/docview/1625529430/fulltextPDF/B6822FD8420B40F6PQ/1?accountid=11008

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Embargo Period

12-12-2018

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