Title

Who Am I and How Do I Become Myself: A Group Curriculum for Identity Development

Publication Date

7-2017

Abstract

Identity development, as proposed by Erikson’s psychosocial theory of development, is the critical task of adolescence. However, research suggests that this process of identity formation continues to occur beyond the adolescent years into the season of life defined as emerging adulthood. This transitional period of emerging adulthood is a distinct stage between adolescence and adulthood which involves the dynamic exploration and consolidation of key life experiences that contribute to one’s evolving sense of self. This is also a vulnerable stage in one’s developmental journey, which is often fraught with distress and confusion. Building on these findings and responding to the need for scaffolding of identity formation in the emerging adulthood years, I have developed a psychoeducational group curriculum to facilitate this crucial developmental process. In this curriculum, I utilize a creative and integrative approach that is based on Dan McAdams’ (1995) 3 levels of personality and framed within the metaphor of a tree. The purpose of the curriculum is to provide emerging adults with the opportunity to consolidate meaning from their past experiences, gain self-awareness in their present functioning, and learn new strategies for growth in their future. The curriculum is comprised of 8 one-hour modules that includes psychoeducation, video presentations, personal introspection, group discussion, mindful reflection, and concludes with a creative integration project.

Degree Name

PSYD in Clinical Psychology

First Advisor

Tan, Siang-Yang

Date Uploaded

11-27-2018

Collection Number

Psych0371E

Document Type

Dissertation

File Name

Tompkins_fuller.psych_0371E_10191

Language

English

Keywords

Group identity, Identity, Identity in youth, Self-actualization in adolescence, Curriculum planning

Disciplines

Psychology

Rights

Material hosted by ProQuest subject to copyright

Comments

This was uploaded by the David Allan Hubbard Library from the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (ProQuest). If there are any mistakes in this record, please contact archives@fuller.edu.

ProQuest URL

https://search.proquest.com/docview/2023586944/141A4493B2C74B0EPQ/1?accountid=11008

Upload File

wf_no

Embargo Period

11-27-2018

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