Title

Coping and Burnout in a Sample of Salvadoran Teachers

Publication Date

5-2014

Abstract

Considering the unique experiences of individuals living in El Salvador, a context often characterized by its high level of community and gang related violence, coping with stress becomes a vital resource that has the potential to either increase or decrease one's level of distress. The aim of this study was thus to explore the relationship between coping strategies and reported levels of burnout in a sample of 257 Salvadoran elementary and high school teachers. Hierarchical regressions were used to analyze the relationship between study variables. Findings indicated that Salvadoran teachers employing higher levels of emotion-focused coping strategies such as venting, denial, and behavioral disengagement also report higher levels of burnout, as hypothesized ( p = .002). Discouraging teachers from engaging in emotion-focused coping strategies could enhance preventative and supportive clinical interventions with this population. Additional research is needed to determine alternative adaptive coping strategies that might be more effective for teachers in high violence contexts.

Degree Name

Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD)

First Advisor

Putman, Katharine Meese

Document Type

Dissertation

Language

English

Keywords

Teachers, Job stress, El Salvador, Burn out, Prevention, Life skills

Disciplines

Psychology

Comments

Public Access: If you attend a college or university, you may be granted access for free through your school library subscription to ProQuest Theses & Dissertations. Copies may be available for purchase via ProQuest Dissertations Publishing https://dissexpress.proquest.com/search.html

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Embargo Period

11-21-2018

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