Title

Teaching As Urban Ministry: Teaching-Specific Chronic Stressors and Burnout in Urban Ministry

Author

Sean M. Love

Publication Date

6-2011

Abstract

Previous research has shown that stressors in urban environments contribute to high levels of burnout in teachers (Abel & Sewell, 1999; Butler & Constantine, 2005; Farber, 2000). This study assesses the impact of chronic stressors and burnout on teachers in faith-based urban ministries. Two hundred eighty-four urban ministry workers completed a survey measuring demographics, chronic stressors, and burnout. It was hypothesized that urban teachers would report more total chronic stressors, more teaching-specific chronic stressors, and higher levels of burnout than other urban ministry workers. It was hypothesized that higher levels of teacher-specific chronic stressors are positively correlated with higher levels of Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization, and negatively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. An ANCOVA revealed that urban teachers had significantly higher levels of Personal Accomplishment. The data implies that various types of urban ministry workers suffer from chronic stress and burnout, teachers among them. Social service agencies, school administrators, and clinics should be aware of these factors when tailoring services to these populations.

Degree Name

Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD)

First Advisor

Eriksson, Cynthia B.

Document Type

Dissertation

Language

English

Keywords

Teacjomg. Burn out, Stress, Urban ministry

Disciplines

Psychology

Comments

Public Access: If you attend a college or university, you may be granted access for free through your school library subscription to ProQuest Theses & Dissertations. Copies may be available for purchase via ProQuest Dissertations Publishing https://dissexpress.proquest.com/search.html

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Embargo Period

11-20-2018

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