Title

Prayer Choice: A Motivational Prayer Intervention

Publication Date

3-2013

Abstract

There have been many types of prayer practiced throughout the Judeo-Christian tradition. These traditions provide the opportunity to utilize differing prayer styles to create a more motivational and robust prayer life. The primary purpose for prayer is for the believer to communicate with God. However, many use prayer for health and personal benefit. The literature is replete with interventions evaluating these sorts of potential prayer effects, including benefits to the pray-er independent of the intended purpose of the prayer. The reasons that prayer may or may not work are debated, and the various types of prayer that are considered best are disputed as well throughout both the psychological as well as theological literature. This controversy is further evaluated through the example of Intercessory Prayer as a means of understanding the potential controversies and demonstrating the importance of an intervention that promotes indigenous prayer behavior. This present proposed program, termed "prayer choice," takes the approach that prayer can and should occur in many forms that are congruent to the spiritual and/or religious tradition of each participant, as well as their learning histories and personal preferences. Its overall aim is to create an intervention that is consistent with proven motivational and behavioral science approaches from within one's own religious tradition. This paper concludes with a description of an intervention program designed and individually adapted for the development, promotion and maintenance of a prayer lifestyle habit through applying motivational interviewing principles via a modern, social media/cell-phone application.

Degree Name

PSYD in Clinical Psychology

First Advisor

Martin, John E.

Date Uploaded

11-27-2018

Collection Number

Psych0371E

Document Type

Dissertation

File Name

Wehle_fuller.psych_0371E_10033

Language

English

Keywords

Prayer, Christianit, Psychology, Biblical teaching

Disciplines

Psychology

Rights

Material hosted by ProQuest subject to copyright

Comments

This was uploaded by the David Allan Hubbard Library from the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (ProQuest). If there are any mistakes in this record, please contact archives@fuller.edu.

ProQuest URL

https://search.proquest.com/docview/1477293818/34FF3209132B4A35PQ/1?accountid=11008

Upload File

wf_no

Embargo Period

11-27-2018

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